Helping Children Learn To Write

Thursday, 9 April 2015

Helping Children Learn To Write

learning to write


Writing has not come easy to big or middle man. I don't know the scientific reasons behind it, but I believe that boys in particular find it harder to learn to write. It has something to do with fine motor skills and muscle development. Talking to the boys' teachers, they recommended activities which would build their fine motor skills. 

Playing with Playdoh is something they particularly recommend. Other activities that are good are Lego and Hama beads. We also have some games that we have found useful. We have the children's version of operation which they enjoy playing and helps build those fine motor skills. Other games they enjoy which use tweezers are Dino Bite and Jolly Octopus.

Middle Man has found the Alpha Blocks Reading system helpful. Although the letters and words in the magazine aren't cursive which he is learning in reception, it is helping him with his letter formation. 

We have purchased triangular pencil holders to help with grip but have had limited success with these as they were quite large and didn't fit on all pencils. You can also buy triangular colouring pencils to help your child with their grip.

We have recently been sent a section of Stabilo products which I am really impressed with. 

stabilo products
Firstly they are great as they come on right and left handed styles. The grip seems to work well and they boys have been eager to use these to help improve their writing. At school they are only allowed to write in pencil and these push up ones have come in handy when doing their homework. They in left and right handed and they are marked with and L or R so you don't get confused.

right handed pen
At the end of the day it is practice that is going to help the boys the most, but having a pencil that they find comfortable to use is certainly a good starting point.
Do you have any top tips or recommendations on helping your children learn to write? 


54 comments:

donna hale said...

just lots of practice and patience

Tracy K Nixon said...

Great review thank you!

ashleigh allan said...

These look great!

Maggie Lee-Roberts said...

Not really, my son is left-handed and had real problems learning to write. He got there in the end. I think they just have to be physically mature enough, although these pens would have helped him a lot.

Harley Richardson said...

These look fab x

AndiG said...

School give them things like sand, rice, shaving foam to practice letters in

emma j lowe said...

just let them take their time, don't pressure them to get things right first time

jackie Chapman said...

Encouragement is so important.

Susie Wilkinson said...

I'm left-handed, and initially I wrote everything from right to left in mirror writing, my Mum used to show me it in the mirror and say how clever it was but that no-one else would understand it so I had to learn to write like everyone else. I really struggled to start with, but 2 years later I was top of my year at school. They'll get there with help and encouragement, but don't make it too much of a chore, otherwise it'll ruin a wonderful skill for life.

Louise Fairweather said...

I think you are right. I am reluctant to push them too much, just try and make it fun and as easy as possible. I find it hard helping middle man as he is left handed.

Louise Fairweather said...

I've seen that - thinks it helps with the formation when they haven't got the fine motor skills yet.

Louise Fairweather said...

Praise goes a long way

Louise Fairweather said...

That's what I think susie. I don't want to put them off school when they have only just started.

james rowlands said...

Try Try and Try again never give up

Lisa Everaert said...

Encourage all the way, for everyone that succeeds they`ve also failed multiple times. x

Georgia Norton said...

Start with a pencil and pencil grip and work up from there. Oh and always be encouraging! :)

Sara Janeg said...

Encouragement and practice

Claire Nutman said...

I agree, plenty of practice x

joe said...

awesome!

Claire Woods said...

I agree plenty of practice.

❄❄️️Kate Cass❄️❄️ said...

Lydia wants to run before she can walk, she is desperate to perfect joined up handwriting, but rushes printing so it becomes big and messy compared to when she concentrates, she is getting better but she's such a creative girl that she likes the Los and curl of her letters I think, almost 7 but wants to write like Mummy does sometimes!

Scott Walliss said...

Try and try again

Angie McDonald said...

Wow these sound fab! Might have to suggest these to my sister as my niece really wants to improve her handwriting too!

dorothy cavender said...

patience & practice

Claire GriffithssoontobeAldrid said...

plenty of practice

✰★ღ Kayleigh ✰★ღ said...

Patience

lynn heath said...

My son struggles with his writing too, his teacher says that it is very spidery I try to encourage him to write as much as I can, but in fairness he would much rather be out kicking a football!

crazyvicky said...

practice, but it has to be fun practice, otherwise it becomes a chore.

Angela Campbell said...

I get my kids out in the park on the climbing frames as much as I can to help with handwriting...it helps build the strength in their arms thus improving grip for writing :)

Vicki Hennie said...

oooo some great tips x x

Jo Carroll said...

Get your children familiar with how to hold pens and pencils properly from an early age but never put too much pressure on them.

Jean Vaughan said...

Colouring in is the first step to learning to write so start with chubby crayons and decrease size as the little one improves. Holding a pen will then just become an extension of this practise.

kim neville said...

My son had a problem with his grip and wasnt too interested in writing at first. He is a bit of a climber and always hanging off monkey bars and that helped strengthen his hands as well along with play-doh. As soon as he started school he changed and held pen fine and has really neat writing :-)

Gill Mitchell said...

These look great, my son is good at writing but still doesnt hold it quite right.

Robert Price said...

They look very good

Ellie Spider said...

I work for children's OT and we recommend the stabilo pens - we also recommend doing lots of fine motor activities and hand/finger activities to increase control and hand strength and dexterity.

Colin Anderson said...

what a great idea

Kim Styles said...

what an excellent idea, my son has always had problems with writing and motor skills

Eve Burke said...

Fab idea!!

Kazz Usher said...

Interesting, my only tip I have with my child is like I always say to him "Its okay to make mistakes" my little boy gets so frustrated when he makes a mistake and Im always there saying "Its okay"

soneailiami said...

fab idea! my son use left hand and it's not easy

Sandy Ralph said...

these look great

Sarah Evans said...

what a great idea :)

Minnie Beth said...

These look fab - working in schools, I see the importance of good pens/pencils upon the ease of handwriting...it is not easy! x

Jo Snook-Abbs said...

My eldest is in the gifted & talented programme, but his writing is like a spider has crawled across the page . . . his younger brother has better handwriting than him! We'll try some of these tips with him - thank you!

Marie Evans said...

I think by making mistakes in like that's how you learn.

Rebecca Cleary said...

I think just leaving them at first to 'get to grips' with what they are doing and become familiar with what they are using and then bring in the more 'technical' implements. I remember seeing my daughters teacher (shes 5 now) using tweezers with them and I was thinking what are they doing, but it works really well. I cant remember them using tweezers when my 10 year old was in nursery!
Becci Cleary

purplevamp said...

Just let them practice. Don't tell them off for getting it wrong, we all have to learn and you learn better from making mistakes.

Ali Johnson said...

Neither of my sons write well. The eldest is Dyslexic & Dyspraxic so even though he has help he still doesn't hold a pen correctly or write very well. The youngest is a typical boy that can't be bothered! I have worked extensively with him, bought him nice comfortable grip pens, but his writing is still very bad. I live in hope that one day all the effort will pay off & his handwriting will improve.

Terrie-Ann Wright said...

let them practise as well as letting them hold the pencil however they feel comfortable. there are no rules on how it should be done so long as the end product is the same.

Vickie Jackson said...

I think it's about patience :)

Tina Lighten-Duncan said...

Patience, every child is different and will learn and get the hang of it in their own time.

Crystal said...

My frustration is that my eldest can write really nicely, if he's in a good mood and takes his time. Most of the time I struggle to read what he's written though... patience and practice it is then! Might try some different pencils and pens too though. :-)

Vero LS said...

Looks like a good product, thanks for the review. I will look into it as my daughter will find it very helpful (she struggles with her handwriting)